Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary is a herb with leaves that look like flat pine needles. They are deep green in colour on top and silver-white underneath.

 

Rosemary’s  flavour and unique health benefits makes it an indispensable herb for every kitchen.

Allergen: no

Introduction: 6 months

Selection:

Whenever possible, choose fresh rosemary over the dried form of the herb since it has a far better flavour.

 

Fresh rosemary should look vibrant and should have a deep sage green colour, and be free from yellow or dark spots.

 

If you buy dried rosemary, make sure it has not been irradiated (organic dried herbs will not be irradiated).

 

Storage:

Store fresh rosemary, unwashed in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 10-14 days.

 

Store fresh rosemary, unwashed, chopped in ice-cube trays, covered with olive oil, water or stock in the freezer 4-6 months.

Add a cube to purées, stews or soups.

 

Store dried rosemary in a sealed glass container in a cool, dark place for 6 months.

 

Alternatively, you can place some sprigs in vase of water on your kitchen counter.

Preparation/Use:

Soak the rosemary in a salt-, vinegar-, or hydrogen peroxide water solution for 20 minutes then rinse under running water.

 

As the rosemary stem is difficult to eat, the leaves should be removed from the stem. Alternatively, add the whole sprig to season soups, stews and meat dishes, then simply remove it before serving.

 

Rosemary should be added towards the end of cooking so it can retain its taste, colour and nutritional value (the flavour can become bitter after long cooking).

 

Rosemary can be added to purées, soups, stews and are a great addition to meat dishes in particular.

 

As with other herbs, you can make a medicinal tea from the leaves – place some fresh rosemary into boiling water, steep for at least 10 -15 minutes, strain, and sip throughout the day.

 

You can also make rosemary infused oil. Place a sprig or two of completely dry rosemary leaves into a glass jar, top with olive oil, replace the lid, and shake lightly. Store in a warm, dark place for two weeks, strain, and pour back into the glass jar.

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Nutritional Value:

Rosemary is a GOOD source of: vitamin A (in the form of pro-vitamin A carotenoid phytonutrients).


Don’t Just Eat Rosemary!

There are many ways (other than your mouth) to get the good stuff in!

 

Your skin is the largest organ of your body and since it is porous, it absorbs whatever you put on it. What you put on your body is just as significant as what you put in your body.

 

(See the “Don’t Just Eat Food” chapter in Mila’s Meals: The Beginning & The Basics for ways to use ingredients outside of the kitchen, into the bathroom or beyond.)

Rosemary Essential Oil

Another way to benefit from Rosemary’s medicinal properties is by using the essential oil.

Rosemary essential oil is safe to use on children but should not be used by pregnant women. Do not used undiluted oils on children.

This oil is a useful remedy for constipation, jaundice, headaches as well as improving memory (for the mushy-mommy brains out there 🙂 ).

HOW TO USE:

  • Add to a diffuser: Fill the bowl of the burner/vaporiser with water and then add 3 – 6 drops of essential oil. Light the candle and the oil will evaporate as the water heats up. Do not let the bowl dry out.

  • Massage: for children – mix 1 drop with 2 Tablespoons carrier oil, mix thoroughly and apply. For adults you can use 5-6 drops / T. carrier oil

  • Inhalations: Add 1 drop for children (or 4 – 5 drops for adults) into a bowl of steaming water. Place a towel over your head, close your eyes and lean over the bowl. Inhale the vapour for a few minutes.

  • Baths: Add a drop to the bath water. For adults add 5 – 10 drops.

 
Essential oils are the highly concentrated active ingredients of plants. They should always be diluted in a base before use and should not be taken internally without professional recommendation.
 
When using essential oils on babies and children, it is always best to dilute 1-2 drops of pure essential oils with 1 tsp. base oil (coconut oil / almond oil / olive oil).
 
Keep essential oils out of children’s reach. If an oil is ever ingested, give the child an oil-soluble liquid such as milk or cream. Then call your local poison control center or seek emergency medical attention.
Rosemary

Rosemary contains substances that are useful for stimulating the immune system, increasing circulation, and improving digestion.

 

Rosemary also contains anti-inflammatory compounds that may make it useful for reducing the severity of asthma attacks. In addition, rosemary has been shown to increase the blood flow to the head and brain, improving concentration.

 

Traditionally it has been used as an antiseptic, antidepressant, analgesic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, disinfectant, aphrodisiac, and expectorant.

 

Rosemary in large quantities should be avoided in pregnancy – due to its uterine-stimulating properties.


Rosemary is used in the following recipes in  ‘Mila’s Meals: The Beginning & The Basics’.

milas-meals-lamb-casserole-recipe
Lamb Casserole (pg 314)
Veggie Spread (pg 288)
Mila's-Meals-Chicken-Broth-Recipe
Chicken Bone Broth
(pg 356)
Beef Bone Broth (pg 358)

ADD ROSEMARY TO YOUR DRIED HERB COLLECTION:

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ADD ROSEMARY TO YOUR ESSENTIAL OIL COLLECTION:

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WHY NOT TRY THESE?:

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FIND MORE DELICIOUS AND NUTRITIOUS ORGANIC GOODIES HERE:

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