Whey

Introduction age, nutritional and preparation information for Whey.

Whey

The information below relates to whey from goat’s milk kefir.

Remember the nursery rhyme about little Miss Muffet eating her curds and whey? “Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet eating her curds and whey…”. I sang this song many times, but it was not until I began my traditional and whole foods journey that I discovered what whey actually is!

Many people have heard of whey as a protein powder supplement, however the original whey is something quite different.

Whey is the tart, golden liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. Milk is curdled during the cheese, yoghurt or kefir making process. Sweet whey is a natural by-product of the cheese making process. You can make your own ‘sour whey’ by straining yoghurt or kefir. Liquid whey was known to the founding fathers of medicine as “healing water.” In fact, Hippocrates frequently recommended whey to his patients.

Whey from fermented milk (such as that made from kefir or yoghurt) is virtually lactose-free as the cultures digest the lactose during the fermentation process.

Allergen: Hypoallergenic

According to Dr. Thomas Cooper, goat’s whey can be used as a hypoallergenic protein substitute for children and adults who are allergic to cow’s milk. Dr. Cooper notes that over 90 percent of children who have an allergy to cow’s milk do not show allergy symptoms when using goat’s whey. For people who cannot tolerate cow’s milk, goat’s whey can be a good way to attain the benefits of drinking milk without the symptoms.

Introduction: 6 months

Storage:

Airtight, glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 6 months

Preparation/Use:

To make your own whey is so simple:

Line a sieve with cheesecloth or a coffee filter and place over a bowl. Pour in the kefir/yoghurt. Cover and allow to stand over night. In the morning you will have kefir/yoghurt cheese in the strainer, and whey in the bowl.

Whey can be added to any purée or smoothie for a nutrient boost. It can also be used for fermenting fruit and vegetables or when soaking your nuts, seeds, legumes and grains.


Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Nutritional Value:

Whey is an EXCELLENT source of: probiotics

Whey is a VERY GOOD source of: calcium and phosphorus

Whey is a GOOD source of: B vitamins, potassium, zinc and selenium.


Whey has anti-oxidant-, antiseptic- and immune-boosting benefits. It is a complete protein that is easy digested and assimilated by the body.

Whey will assist the kidneys and liver in the elimination of toxins. The probiotics in whey aid digestion and assimilation of nutrients and support the immune system.

“Whey is the liquid gold essence of milk that supports our immune system and maintains our protective flora throughout life. This long-forgotten, valuable food should again be made part of our regular diet for good colon health.”  
– Nourishing Traditions. Sally Fallon


Whey is used in the following recipes in  ‘Mila’s Meals: The Beginning & The Basics’.

Mila's Meals Dilly Carrots
Dilly Carrots (pg 362)
Bubbling Berries (pg 364)
Fermented Apple Sauce
(pg 366)

MAKE YOUR OWN WHEY

(click the image to go to see product details)

MAKE YOUR OWN KEFIR:

(click the image to go to see product details)

FIND MORE DELICIOUS AND NUTRITIOUS ORGANIC GOODIES HERE:

BUY THE BOOK:

(click in the image to go to the shop)

SHARE THE LOVE:

Save

Save

0 Shares
Share
Tweet
+1
Share
Pin
Stumble